Author Topic: Slug control material  (Read 5796 times)

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Online ideasguy

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Slug control material
« on: August 27, 2012, 10:30:12 AM »
What do you think of this material?
http://www.suttons.co.uk/Gardening/Garden+Equipment/Clearance/Slug++Snail+Shocka+Fabric_MH635.htm

My garden was ravaged with slugs and snails this year. I wonder if its worth a try?

NightHawk

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Re: Slug control material
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2012, 12:11:46 PM »
It looks okay George.

And being made of copper 'should' work.  If you recall my posting about the use of copper rings in the garden of our previous house, they actually worked a treat for us.  I've got no experience of this particular design though, so if you can find any customer reviews of this product online anywhere then that could be useful too.

The siting of the fabric matting is crucial too, as we found with the copper rings.  As long as the plants are away from fences or other plants that the slugs/snails can drop from, thereby bypassing the mat, then the little suckers should be thwarted  :D

I think that mat works out cheaper than the copper rings we used, so could prove to be more cost-effective.

See what other members thoughts are.

« Last Edit: August 27, 2012, 12:13:23 PM by Kathy & Laurie »

Offline bossgard

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Re: Slug control material
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2012, 06:50:04 PM »
(This is got to be the most complete and informative message on Dealing with Slugs and Snails, compiled in one place, that I have every come across. It’s from a new garden information source that I am now acquiring in installments. Will tell you about it later in another Forum Posting.)

Use organic and chemical controls to reduce slug and snail populations in order to protect your garden plants.

HOW TO CONTROL –
There are both chemical and organic ways of coping with snail and slug populations. While chemical solutions are fast and reliable, some can pose a threat to pets and children so select one that is iron or copper based. These are safer. Lay traps to attract these pests; try upturned, scooped out grapefruit halves or damp newspapers. Check regularly and kill snails and slugs in a bucket of very soapy water.

Ducks are an effective and natural way of keeping slugs and snails under control. Khaki Campbell and Indian Runner ducks are the best snail and slug controllers on two legs!

Place a shallow saucer of beer in the garden at night this will attract snails and slugs and cause them to drown. Renew each evening.

Use commercially produced organic snail repellent around susceptible plants. It has a gritty texture, as do crushed eggshells – hard to slither over.

Sawdust or wood shavings are cheap and organic. Sprinkle around tender plants and renew regularly.

Straw or hay not only keeps weeds down, but slugs and snails will not slither over it, making it a chemical-free deterrent.

There are various chemical-based pellets, powders and liquids that attract snails and slugs, and kill them very rapidly. Newer products based on iron or copper are safer for children and pets. Older generation products can pose a risk to pets and children, as well as to native birds which may eat the dying mollusks.

Never leave snail baits out in piles or in trays or they can attract pets or children. Scatter them thinly throughout the beds of garden plants. Use a few pellets at a time, spread very thinly, out of sight beneath foliage, and then renew them once a week, rather than distributing large quantities at once.

Identify which plants are most at risk, and only use pellets around them and not in other parts of the garden.

Snails and Slug Favorites:
Beets – Check behind leaves daily; sprinkle sawdust around the base of the plants.
Tomatoes – Snails will climb the stems and eat the fruit, create a barrier around each plant.
Cabbage – Take care when the heads are forming as slugs get in between the leaves; remove by hand.
Lettuce – Protect young seedlings, as they are particularly susceptible; use saucers of beer at night.
Annual Seedlings – Most young seedlings are attractive to snails and slugs; check daily for signs of infestations.
Hellebores – The foliage of these perennials can be stripped by slugs; protect with a mulch of lucerne(?) hay.
Petunias – These fast growers have succulent foliage than can be eaten rapidly; surround with barrier of sawdust.
Lupins – Snails and slugs feast on both foliage and flowers; remove manually or use barriers.


Offline bossgard

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Re: Slug control material
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2012, 06:53:41 PM »

(This got left out of the previous posting!)

CAUTION: When handling snail baits, such as pellets or powders, always use gloves, and avoid any skin or eye contract with the product. Create a child- and pet-proof trap. Cut the neck off a plastic bottle, place chemical snail baits in the base and hide it in the garden bed. Snails will crawl in and die, but bait is harder for others to reach. Keep packets of snail bait away from sunlight and moisture. A childproof cupboard is the safest place for storage.

(Hope this helps!)

Online ideasguy

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Re: Slug control material
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2012, 07:57:41 PM »
Yes, Laurie, your Copper Rings posting was certainly very interesting, but as you say a bit expensive for extensive use. This year, slugs are everywhere - epidemic proportions. The mild winter followed by the monsoon period which now replaces summer  ::) ::) has obviously been in their favour.
I could write a book on my theories ;D (I reckon they are amorously rampant - they are always found in twos in my garden - eggs found in abundance - I think its a lovers lane meeting place!
Frogs are supposed to eat them. I found dozens of them in a compost bag I use to fill with weeds to take to the dump and inside was a poor "trapped" frog - I reckon they had him lined up for breakfast)
I'm gonna try that thar fabric!

Thanks for that posting Toby. There are some good ideas there (except for the beer - I can think of better uses for it ::))
Seriously, I'm gong to try some of those suggestions - sawdust, wood shavings, straw and hay.




Offline Eric Hardy

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Re: Slug control material
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2012, 10:00:36 AM »

Snails and Slug Favorites:
Beets – Check behind leaves daily; sprinkle sawdust around the base of the plants.
Tomatoes – Snails will climb the stems and eat the fruit, create a barrier around each plant.
Cabbage – Take care when the heads are forming as slugs get in between the leaves; remove by hand.
Lettuce – Protect young seedlings, as they are particularly susceptible; use saucers of beer at night.
Annual Seedlings – Most young seedlings are attractive to snails and slugs; check daily for signs of infestations.
Hellebores – The foliage of these perennials can be stripped by slugs; protect with a mulch of lucerne(?) hay.
Petunias – These fast growers have succulent foliage than can be eaten rapidly; surround with barrier of sawdust.
Lupins – Snails and slugs feast on both foliage and flowers; remove manually or use barriers.

I think you can add delphiniums to that list, they love ours  :(

Eric

Offline roiphil

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Re: Slug control material
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2012, 10:30:43 AM »
last year we were literally inundated with slugs at night the back grass looked like it was moving in places and it was with slugs  :o, i have been considering getting some ducks to control them, going back to flower beds though in the uk we tried some stuff called coco shells think we got it from somewhere like b&q its the same as woodchip but apparently the slugs dont like crawling across it due to the sharp edges it seemed to work as the beds did not get slug attacked

NightHawk

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Re: Slug control material
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2012, 12:10:06 PM »
I think every garden should have a duck Phil - great idea  :D  You've certainly got the space for that option  ;)

Coco shells, or any kinds of shells / sharp surface materials are good.  The shells can also act as a decoration as well as functional.

Keep us updated with the method/s you choose and any success/failure you have.

Offline Palustris

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Re: Slug control material
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2012, 01:16:44 PM »
There is one, if not two tine weeny problems with ducks. 1 Their great big flat feet and 2. They are dirty birds.
Our ducks flattened everything in their path when they walked round the garden. And they really need running water as they turn still water into green foul (pun intended) smelling sludge in no time at all.
There is no point having them penned if you want them to eat up the slugs, but they do not eat snails unless you crush the shells first.

Offline roiphil

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Re: Slug control material
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2012, 12:04:00 PM »
keeping ducks is not a problem here when you have natural springs in the next field a duck will always find water, they would be good on grass areas not so sure in a veg or flower beds though i did read of some one using them in their veg beds as they did not want to use slug pellets with great results, and yes they are dirty birds leaving duck poop trails and they can soon turn a nice green bit of lawn into a muddy mess,

but all that said if you have the space for them to wander to different fields ideal, when we kept them before at the old place, they used to waddle across the field to get to the little river, then they would waddle back in the evening, they sort of knew when it was bed time  8)

Offline Palustris

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Re: Slug control material
« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2012, 12:30:06 PM »
Ours refused to come home when they went out into the fields and on the one occasion when I could not persuade them to return and left them to it, a fox ate the lot.