Author Topic: Hellebores  (Read 3821 times)

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Offline Palustris

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Hellebores
« on: February 05, 2009, 03:02:34 pm »

NightHawk

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Re: Hellebores
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2009, 03:34:58 pm »
Thanks for that link Eric.  A very interesting site indeed.  8)

We have 2 Helleborus orientalis plants in the front garden and 4 of them in the back garden.

There's 1 Helleborus ericsmithii in the back garden, and this is Kathy's favourite.

Laurie.

Online ideasguy

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Re: Hellebores
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2009, 04:07:35 pm »
I dont have enough Hellebores in my garden. Thanks for the reminder - will buy some more.

I have a few H. niger and a few (bought untagged - what I have identified to be) H. corsicus  OR H. argutifolius (is there a difference, or is the former a synonym of the latter?)
   
Whens the best time to plant?

NightHawk

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Re: Hellebores
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2009, 04:28:33 pm »
We don't know about the names you've mentioned George, but the best time to plant is now.

As a comparison, Kathy bought an established plant and a new plant a while ago.  The new plant didn't flower until the following year, so she recommends that it is an investment to buy a more mature plant that's already in flower.

Laurie.

Offline Palustris

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Re: Hellebores
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2009, 04:55:06 pm »
Selection of mine. We have about 100 culimps.  More pics available

H. x ballardii

H foetidus

H. thibetana

H. hybrids of various forms.



















Double forms


I cannot find a picture of H. argutifolius, but the flowers are like H. foetidus only pure green. Nor can I find one of H. purpurescens. I think one of the deeper purple ones above may be it.
H. corsicus is a synonym for H. argutifolius

Online ideasguy

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Re: Hellebores
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2009, 05:05:55 pm »
Thats a really nice collection you have there, Eric, in a wide range of very nice colours.
I'd love to have those in my garden!

RE:
Quote
H. corsicus is a synonym for H. argutifolius
I thought so. Thats cleared that up!
On a search on H. corsicus using the RHS button in GA100S36, the RHS website brings up:
Helleborus
argutifolius  (H4) 55 supplier(s)
corsicus 'Marble' (v) 1 supplier(s)
That does indeed suggest that H. corsicus is a synonmy and H. argutifolius is the "name of the moment"
But interestingly, the species corsicus is still used for the cultivar 'Marble'

Suffice to say, its a lovely plant, with very handsome foliage all year, and absolutely masses of those pale green/yellowish flowers.
I have it planted beside Camellias. I think its a good companion colour for the reds and pinks.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2009, 05:07:32 pm by ideasguy »

Offline Palustris

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Re: Hellebores
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2009, 05:30:49 pm »
Ours is a bit of a seed weed. I have to pull a lot of them out every year.

Online ideasguy

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Re: Hellebores
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2009, 07:57:16 pm »
One mans weed would be another mans pride. Funny isnt it!
That being the case, are they easy to grow from seed in the greenhouse?
How long to germinate?

Theres a good range of Hellebores in the Chiltern catalog:
Helleborus orientalis Mixed Hybrids (3.30)
Helleborus Primrose and Yellow Hybrids   (3.66)
Helleborus Very Best Spotted Hybrids (3.64)
Are they worth a try?

Offline Palustris

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Re: Hellebores
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2009, 08:42:12 pm »
With all respect to seed suppliers,  the seeds are as good as dead. Dried seed is very very hard to germinate. And in any case they tend to revert to the spotted pink. If you want seed and you remember at the correct time and you ask me I will try to send you some. We usually have tons.
It is better sown fresh and left to the weather to germinate in Spring. Takes three years to reach flowering size.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2009, 09:17:30 pm by Palustris »

Online ideasguy

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Re: Hellebores
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2009, 10:00:55 pm »
Do you mean to sow outdoors?
I'll take a half ton of those seeds when they are ready, Eric!  :D

I recall from some of my previous orders that Chiltern keep some of their seed in cold storage, so that would be almost like a part of the stratifying process. They advised to sow the ones taken from cold storage immediately.