Author Topic: the edge of the wood  (Read 5629 times)

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Offline greenfinger

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the edge of the wood
« on: November 04, 2006, 08:53:46 AM »
In my garden you'll find some borders with mostly sunloving perennials. I've planted them in various places. During the 27 years we live here I kept one eye on a small, rather neglected area at the edge of the garden. It's 26 meters long and 6 meter broad. Fifteen or twenty years ago (time flies) I planted there 5 hazels, 3 willows, 2 amelanchiers. Wild elders and mountain-ashes came uninvited. They are welcome as long as I can handle them. Some geraniums, euphorbia's, saxifraga's, rodgersia's were brought in last 2 years. This fall I decided to take the bull by the horns and to integrate this area in one little wood edge biotope with dappled shadow. The soil is dry and poor. I want to improve its quality to give this project a fine start.
Every few days I'll try to give report about the progress of it.
Good advice is always welcome of course.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2006, 10:24:46 AM by greenfinger »

Online ideasguy

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2007, 11:34:31 AM »
Heres a couple of suggestions André
Brunnera is a shade lover.

Brunnera macrophylla 'Jack Frost'
http://www.ideasforgardens.net/forumpics/RIMG0009-20070428.JPG

and
Brunnera macrophylla 'Dawsons White'
http://www.ideasforgardens.net/forumpics/RIMG0012-20070428.JPG

I bought these babies last night, and they are really nice.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2007, 07:43:10 PM by ideasguy »

Offline greenfinger

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2007, 04:41:56 PM »
I knew of the existence of these plants but didn't plant them yet. Always wondered why that 'Jack Frost'- variety got that particular name. It's not a sleuth?
Another (perhaps somewhat risky?) suggestion for beautiful leaf in the dappled shadow: Cardiocrinum giganteum.
One of the past evenings I took a picture of the "edge of the wood". See the attachment.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2007, 04:59:23 PM by greenfinger »

Online ideasguy

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2007, 06:11:36 PM »
There was a Cardiocrinum for sale at that show last night.
The Nurseryman selling the plants said they are VERY slow growing, and take years to come to flower.
I have some photos - will dig them out.

Offline greenfinger

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2007, 09:21:30 PM »
7 to 10 years I was told.
Graham Stuart wrote "this is perhaps the most imposing of all hardy flowering plants. Immense leaves lose size the higher they are disposed up the immensely stout stalk, from the top of which hang many long, narrow trumpet-flowers, pointed downwards, of greenisch white, with maroon red in the throat." This seems worth the patience and  efforts to help it through the growing.
This one has already some shoots, but you have to wait to take them after the flowering. The head plant itself dies after flowering.

Online ideasguy

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2007, 11:04:49 PM »
Heres a couple of photos I took in the garden of a gentleman called Harold McBride, from Lisburn here in N Ireland.
Harold is a prominent member of Alpine Garden Society and gives Garden Lectures in many countries.

He was very proud of these plants. It was my introduction to these plants, so I'm afraid I didnt appreciate the length of time it had takeb for his polants to reach such a formidable size and to flower so stunningly.

General view of the collection (not all the same species as I recall):
http://www.ideasforgardens.net/forumpics/HaroldMcBride-cardiocrinums2.jpg

Close up:
http://www.ideasforgardens.net/forumpics/HaroldMcBrde-cardiochrinum02.jpg

Please explain what you men by:
Quote
The head plant itself dies after flowering.

Offline greenfinger

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #6 on: April 29, 2007, 08:33:15 AM »
Thanks for the pictures.
Yes, "head plant", probably I didn't make myself sufficiently clear as this is a somewhat free translation from the Dutch language. What I mean is: the initial plant dies off and the shoots have to take over.
As you can see on the pictures the stalks are remarkably thick. The photos show how right Graham Thomas was in his description of them.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2007, 08:38:21 AM by greenfinger »

Online ideasguy

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2007, 09:27:05 AM »
Still not quite sure here:
Quote
the initial plant dies off and the shoots have to take over.
I hope this isnt a stupid question, but, are the shoots on the same plant?

They were statuesque, I have to say. Very impressive.
They look fleshy - do they need a lot of moisture?

Offline greenfinger

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2007, 09:44:21 AM »
No, not a stupid question, I think it's merely myself having a little lingual problem to make myself completely clear and yes the shoots have the same motherplant as origin.
As its leaves are pretty big I assume it evaporates a lot. So I give it water on a nearly daily basis. Till now it seems quite satisfied.
I add a few pictures of and in the "wood edge" taken this morning.

Online ideasguy

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2007, 10:23:52 AM »
That last photo gives a very good overview of yoru project, Andre. Take a few more like that. Look for the opportunity to get a few when the sun is not shining so there are no shadows.

Guessing:
First pic - Solomons seal (Polygonatum) ?
What is the plant behind it? The one with the handsome scalloped leaves.

Second pic (nice little patch of colour)
Are they Muscari?

« Last Edit: April 29, 2007, 10:26:10 AM by ideasguy »

Offline greenfinger

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2007, 03:49:06 PM »
Yes, the first one is Polygonatum. I once had a yellow variety, but it disappeared after one year.
Behind it stands Macleaya cordata, (too?) easer grower.
Second picture: Muscari campanulata.

Offline greenfinger

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #11 on: April 29, 2007, 08:34:53 PM »
That last photo gives a very good overview of yoru project, Andre. Take a few more like that. Look for the opportunity to get a few when the sun is not shining so there are no shadows.



Easy to say, difficult to do: the sun is already shining here for 30 days, always making shadows.

Online ideasguy

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #12 on: April 29, 2007, 10:08:18 PM »
I hope it stays sunny and dry until you get that "little river" project finished!!

Offline greenfinger

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #13 on: April 30, 2007, 07:05:20 AM »
Did Ireland get some rain the last month? We got literally no single drop; a strange story.

Online ideasguy

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Re: the edge of the wood
« Reply #14 on: April 30, 2007, 10:43:04 PM »
We had one month without rain, something very very unusual for Ireland at any time of year, and when it happens in end March to April, its alarming.
We then had a dull week, with light rain overnight - but only one night was sufficeint to give the place a good soaking.
It was great weather for weeding - still is!